Employees Job Performance Session 6 Weekly Topi

Employees Job Performance Session 6 Weekly Topi

Employees Job Performance Session 6 Weekly Topi

Chapter 2 presented the strategic role of Human Resource Management. Chapter 3 discussed employment law with an emphasis on Equal Employment Law. Chapter 4 discussed analyzing jobs and designing work in support of a business’ strategy. Chapter 5 revealed the link between the HRM function of HR Planning and workforce forecasting, and how the workforce forecasting produces an HR Recruiting plan. Chapter 6 discussed the selection process and the roles of HRM and managers in the selection process for identifying the most qualified applicant to fill a job. Once selected, new employees require training; Chapter 7 discussed a process for identifying employees’ training needs; Chapter 8 discussed performance management. Within HRM, performance management is depended upon Job analysis, recruiting, selection, and training. Within the functions of management, performance management evaluates employees’ performance against performance standards identified within respective jobs. The manager’s evaluation of employees’ job performance also identifies additional training needs. Performance management is also linked to chapter 9, identifying and developing selected employees. Performance management is also linked to chapter 10, employee separation and retention. Finally, chapter 11 discussed compensation and how compensation is linked to job analysis and the worth of jobs to an organization.

A common theme throughout these eleven chapters is that competent employees in designed jobs support a business’s ability to compete. A business achieves success in a marketplace by effectively arranging jobs [structure] and employees’ competencies to perform jobs towards designated goals. A business links outcome performance to incentives to motivate employees’ performance towards designated goals.

Chapter 12 discussed recognizing employee contributions. Once again, performance management is linked to a business’s incentive reward programs, that are linked to a business’s designated goals. The purpose of an incentive rewards program is to motivate and incentivize employees’ behavior towards desired outcomes.

You are the manager of a department with 3 supervisors and 18 employees. Your department produces “Do-dads.” Your department received new technology designed to improve production output and quality of product output. This new technology claims to increase productivity by 18%. Your department produces 5,052 Do-dads a product cycle. With the introduction of the new technology, senior management changed production output goal to 5,950 Do-dads a product cycle, an 18% increase. Senior management granted you permission to develop a pay-for-performance incentive program. You see a need to provide an incentive program for the 3 supervisors and an incentive program for the 18 employees.

From the position of a Manager: Identify and argue two reasons WHY it is important to collaborate with HRM on developing your department’s pay-for-performance [incentive] program. Second, review the table 12.1, page 513, and select a pay-for-performance program or a combination of pay-for-performance programs to incentivize the performance of your three supervisors to perform as “performance coaches.” Argue WHY this pay-for-performance program or the combination of pay-for-performance programs will incentivize (motivate) the three supervisors.